inspiration, Writing

The Question

pablo (1)It took me a long time to figure out who I was and why I am here. As a friend once said, “I was trying to live all the lives.” But you only get one. Just one life, just one chance to make something beautiful of this experience on earth, even if you believe in an afterlife. This is our one chance to live our best life here and make a difference.

So, who am I? Why am I here? I can’t say I’ve answered the whole of that question yet, but this I know: I’m a writer and I’m here to make you wonder, “What if…?”

What if the stories are true?

What if the world is more magical and mysterious than we can imagine?

What if you have a part to play?

What if you really could change the world by simply believing?

What if people can really have supernatural powers or experiences?

What if the heroes and villains are really battling it out all around you while you sit there wishing you were part of the story?

What if they’re only waiting for you to choose a side?

What if it’s true? All of it? What then? What does that mean?

How would your life change if right now if you discovered it was all real?

That’s why I write. I write to make you think, to make you wonder, to make you dream. I write to change us all, and in so doing, to change the world. And it all starts with one little question:

inspiration

Divine Inspiration

pablo (1)A lot of writers talk about the authors and books that inspire their writing. It’s a common topic in interviews and I have more than once found myself stumbling over my answer.

I can say how I love C.S. Lewis and his ability to create a world that I wanted to dive into headfirst. I want to write allegory like he did, weaving it so seemlessly with fantasy that readers can be inspired and changed without even fully knowing his underlying concepts. I want to write like Madeleine L’Engel who could take complex science and merge it with the even more intricate and mysterious world of the spirit, creating something that felt new and daring. But most of all I find inspiration in a book that would probably surprise you…the Bible.

I know it may seem an odd choice for a fantasy writer, but you’d be surprised how often it influences my work. As a writer, I’m always wanting to inspire readers to think, “What if…?” When I read the Bible, I’m constantly faced with that question. My imagination goes wild!

What if a group of people were being chased through the desert by an entire army and they find themselves trapped at the edge of the sea? They turn around with their babies in their arms and stare into the distance, enemy chariots stirring up the sand as they race toward the defenseless people. What if the sea splits open, creating a pathway to safety, and the path isn’t even muddy or wet, its completely dry ground?! They cross the sea on dry ground with the water piled up like mountains on either side of them. What if the army chases them right into the middle of the sea and when the last person reaches the other side, the water rushes in, collapsing on top of the army, washing them away?

What if a man lived in such a dangerous place, with enemy troops patrolling around so often that people couldn’t even live normal lives anymore? The people were so scared that they abandoned their homes and went to hide in the mountains, living in caves and crevices. Their crops were stolen by enemy soldiers on a regular basis so that his people were not only living in fear, but hungry, too. So, there he is, hiding in a wine press pit in order to thresh wheat for his family where no one can see it. What if a man suddenly appeared to him, an angel, and called him a mighty warrior? He’s nothing but a weak, cowardly farmer but some divine higher power has chosen him to be the warrior who ends up destroying the entire nation of people who keep invading his land. What if he becomes not only a warrior, but a leader who rescues his people and leads them to reclaim their land.

What if you were sitting in a boat one day with your friends, trying to cross the lake? You travel all night, the wind pushing against you so that you don’t seem to be making any headway at all. Sitting there in the middle of the lake, exhausted, you look out in the darkness and see something moving toward you. It looks like a person. You’re sure it’s a person, it’s a ghost floating above the water and it’s coming right at you! What if, as it comes closer it calls out to you and you realize it’s not a ghost but your friend? The smart alack in your boat yells, “Oh, yeah? If you’re really him, why don’t you call me out to walk with you on the water?” And he does! What if your stupid friend gets out of the boat and actually walks on the water?! The wind is blowing, waves are crashing against the boat and you are sitting there watching two of your closest friends walking on top of the water!

Don’t those sound like great fantasy stories? Each one of them makes me want to ask, “What happened next?” They set my brain on fire. But here’s the real kicker: What if they were real? What if they really happened? Whether you believe the Bible or not, there are billions of people who do! History even proves that many of those people, those places, they were real. So…what if it was all real? What if people could walk on water, teleport to another city, speak to God and hear his voice, glow like lightning? What if someone could understand all languages at once without training? What if you could heal the sick, see spirits, fight demons? What if it was possible to never die or to die and then live again?

THAT is why the Bible is my biggest inspiration. I just can’t help wondering…pablo

What inspires you?

Indie Authors, inspiration, writing advice

Author Inspired: S.R. Johannes

Happy Monday, readers! This morning we have a fabulous treat for all of you joining us for the Uncontrollable Blog Tour. S.R. Johannes is sharing  some fabulous insight and advice for the writers among us. So, without further ado, here’s the good stuff:

Writing is hard. (duh right?!)

I never thought that until I started. All you need is love to GET started. But, if you want to stand out you need more, you need to study the craft and be a sponge for learning. Jump in. There are so many online workshops, conferences, and books. Join critique groups, get critiques, and soak up whatever feedback you can’t. Do it all. You can only get better. You can never learn too much.

That is one thing about me. When I jump in I immerse myself and like a sponge soak up what I can.

I have not always been writing fiction, but I have always written. I’ve been a copywriter for over 15 years writing marketing copy for various products. I didn’t start writing fiction until my daughter was born and I actually had time off to play around. Studying my craft, getting critiques, and joining SCBWI were the best things for me and helped moved me forward as a writer.

If I could go back, I think I would have gotten an MFA instead of a MBA. Since I can’t, I have to find other ways to learn and grow.

The biggest thing I have learned during my last 8 years of frustrations, queries, rejections, agent representation, acquisitions, revisions – is that – if you get rejected or don’t sell your book, it DOES NOT mean your book is not good enough. Publishers and agents look for what is “marketable” and what they think will “sell”. It doesn’t mean your work is not great or sellable. I never realized this until this last year and I wish I knew it sooner because it would have saved me a lot of tears.

I hung my talent on every rejection and every no. I took feedback to heart and kept telling myself I wasn’t good enough. I beat myself up every time a no came across my desk. It wasn’t until I let all that go and had faith that my book was where it needed to be – that I realized I was good enough and was actually better than I thought.

I fretted over pieces and parts of Untraceable for so long only to find out those pieces are what readers love about Untraceable.  Who knew? So try to have confidence in your work to keep going or else it can paralyze you. Take criticisms as opportunities to get better not as roadblocks to your success.

Find out what you love and what you are good at and go for it. Get to be the best at it. Do one genre awesome. I am good at thrillers. I could probably write other stuff but it is not my strength so why force it? I love thrillers and they work well for me.

But most importantly, don’t give up! Keep plugging along and eventually you will find your way.

Now, it may not be the way you had planned or envisioned, but you will find your own way when you are supposed to.

Happy writing!

 

Uncontrollable is coming soon! If you haven’t read Untraceable, grab your FREE copy today & catch up on all the excitement. Now we want to hear from all of you: What issues keep you paralyzed, unable to finish or publish your work? What inspires you to push ahead and keep trying? Please leave us a comment.

Christine Locke, Indie Authors, inspiration, writing advice

Friday Friends: Christine Locke

Christine Locke, author of Open Door, is our guest today. She shares her tips for making your stories unique and exciting.

All my kids are writers—well, all the ones over the age of 10.  There’s something about being young and exerting your personal power through words that resonates with a bright, creative soul.  Our oldest crafted realistic fiction peopled with her friends & acquaintances; her sister wrote poetry.  Our older boy wrote a fantasy fiction series set in “Dragon World.”  My younger two girls write realistic tales about young people, one in the vein of Christian fiction and the other creating screenplays for videos she acts out using her dolls and stop-motion techniques.  I can’t wait to see what my youngest two will write!

Heather has asked me to describe my own process for young writers seeking inspiration.   I’d love to help, so here are three goals I strive to meet to make a story original and entertaining.

 

 1. Make it different.

There are so many stories out that that you already know and love; how do you make your story different?  You’ve probably heard that all good stories start with the question, What if?  That’s important to ask; just don’t stop with the first twist.  Take your favorite story and give it the “What if?” treatment.  We have a name for this now: fan fiction.  It’s a great thing that sometimes leads to new writing careers.   But I encourage you to take the story born from your first What if? and ask again, What if?  Do this enough times and your favorite story and its characters drop away while an original one with new people moves in.  This story is all yours: your plot, your characters, your setting.

For Open Door, I did this with the twin ideas of power and evil (and, ok, at first my process involved a certain popular vampire storyline…).  How does power become evil?  Is power evil in itself?  Even more interesting, how does something evil get powerful?  I went on to ask, What if evil did not wear a human face?  Voldemort, Darth Vader, and Angelis: these are fantastic fictional examples of evil, but all have a familiar, distorted, almost-human form.  What if evil were just as real, but more a potential than a personification?  What if the physical form that evil wore was NOT human-like in any way?

2. Make it Personal

Only you can decide how to make your tales personal.  For Open Door, I cast a young girl as my heroine.  I’m in the middle of raising 5 of them.  I remember feeling alone, confused and isolated when I was my character’s age.  I also set my story in the 1980’s (my own adolescent years) partly to help myself remember those feelings.

Then, I decided to use a real city as my setting.  I love writing about my native Arkansas, but for Open Door, I wanted a unique location.  It had to be isolated, recently a wilderness, full of natural beauty, and a place respecting individuality and creativity.  It delighted me to “find” Eureka Springs, AR a few years ago.  Since then, I’ve visited as often as I can (you will have seen it if you watch the show “Ghost Hunters”).

The small city of Eureka Springs looks, feels, and smells like a place where magic lives.  I read somewhere that Eureka Springs is the only city in the United States where no two roads meet at right angles.  I don’t know if that’s true, but it’s believable.  When we stood in the parking lot of the hotel and looked at the church next door, we were actually looking at the church’s roof.  That’s how steep the hills are there, and it seems every structure is on the side of another hill.  To get to the church next to our hotel, we walked down steep flights of stairs built into the hill on which both the hotel and the church stand.  It’s beautiful, unique, interesting, and mysterious—and it’s great exercise!

 3. Make it perfect.

When I say to make your story perfect, I mean come as close as you can to a grammatically and visually perfect manuscript.  You want your creation to be a pleasure to read: the reader won’t notice how different & personal your story is if there are too many typos!

 

I hope you have the chance to read Open Door, and I hope you love it.  I want to wish you the very best of future success with your own tales.  Above all, I urge you to keep those pens moving across paper, those cursors blipping across screens, and those stories flowing from your own heart out into the waiting world.  Good luck and happy writing!

inspiration, nanowrimo, writer's life

Heather Goes to Camp

I’ve been away from the blog for a few weeks and for two very good reasons: 1) I have been hard at work putting the finishing touches on my soon to be released novel, Light In The Darkness. And, 2) I went to camp.

That’s right, folks. This thirty-something mother of three went to camp for a week with a bunch of the coolest teens I know. We got dirty, down right stinky nasty running around and playing crazy games in the hot southern sun. We played games like Fish Baseball and Zombie Apocalypse Capture the Flag. We built a giant slip-n-slide. We swam in the river and had a blast. It was a wild and crazy week.

One of the things I enjoyed most about camp was meeting so many amazing kids. I discovered that two of my young friends hope to be writers someday (Hi, Anna and Kaitlyn!) and enjoyed talking with them about books they love and the stories they plan to write. I talked with a few gals who insisted they hate to read and are terrible in school (Hi, Rose and DeeAnn!) and this shocked me because they were so very cool and smart. I wish I could be their teacher for a year or two and share with them all of my favorite books and teach them how very fun and fabulous writing can be.  I hope they will stop by the site to visit once in a while and maybe pick up one of the books I have shared in You Gotta Read posts.

Another awesome thing about visiting camp as a writer is the concentrated look at teen relationships that you get in a week of camp. We saw young love and heartbreak, major girl drama and teen angst.  Mostly I saw a lot of great friendships bloom out of seemingly nowhere. We all arrived strangers and left with friends. What an amazing thing. Those memories will be useful when I am creating new characters in my YA books this next year. You can’t beat the experience of real life when you are crafting fiction.

How about you? Did you go to camp this summer? Did you meet any totally cool kids that you wish you could hang out with all year? What awesome new experiences will you be using in your writing this year?

If you’ve got a fabulous idea for a story, why not go ahead and write it? It’s too hot to do much of anything else, so a few hours at your computer desk or on your bed with a pen and a notebook will keep you cool and entertained. Besides, mom and dad can’t get too irritated when they find you writing a book instead of watching tv, right? Man, I’d give my kids cookies for that!

Here’s a great way to help you get started: Camp Nanowrimo! You can join thousands of other writers around the world who are racing to get their stories written before August 31st.  That’s a whole book written in a month!  Think it can’t be done? It can and its a blast.  The perfect kick in the seat to get you motivated to get that story that’s been bouncing around in your brain for years out and into the open page. Sign up now and scroll through their website to see all the fun and silliness that can be had when a bunch of writers jump into the word frenzy that is writing a book in a month.  It’s a blast.  As a matter of fact, my first very first novel was written during Nanowrimo a few years ago. Now I’m getting ready to share it with the world in just a few short days. You never know what magic can happen when you sit down with that idea and let it all out onto the blank page.


Gotta Write,Heather
Brian Clopper, elementary, Friday, Indie Authors, inspiration, writing exercise, writing games

Brainstorming Tips with author Brian Clopper

I was delighted to discover Brian Clopper, an author I shared with you earlier this week in my review of his book, Graham the Gargoyle.  Brian astounds me with his clever writing, but my kids are even more impressed with his artwork.  Brian is also a teacher and I bet his 5th grade students are just about the luckiest kids I know.  How cool to have a teacher who is also a writer and comic book artist!  Today, Brian shares with us some fun tips and tricks for creating new story ideas.  Enjoy!

* * * * * * *

Coming up with story ideas has never been a problem for me. There are three techniques I teach my students to help them gain confidence in brainstorming. All three are quick, fun and easy to do.

Odd Pairings: Take two or three ideas that are wildly different from each other and put them together. For example, I created MONSTERS IN BOXERS, a book about kids who put on magical boxer shorts and transform into superhuman monsters ready to do battle with evil, by pairing monsters with boxers. How can you go wrong with that?

Here are other examples:
MY BIG TOE TALKS TO ME
MY SOAP, THE COMEDIAN
SNOWMAN SHOPPING TRIP
THE CAFETERIA COW
UNDERGROUND ASTRONAUT

Changing Expectations: this technique has some overlap with Odd Pairings. When brainstorming Changing Expectations, you use animal, professions, and objects and think of where you’d expect to find them or how they would act and turn the expectation upside down. Most of us assume an elephant would be large, clumsy and prone to stampeding first and asking questions second. But what if you change the expectation and imagine an elephant that is graceful and delicate. You have yourself an elephant ballerina and world of story possibilities.

Here are some more:
A gargoyle afraid of heights (sorry, already taken in my series GRAHAM THE GARGOYLE)
A noisy Bigfoot
An angry butterfly
A very well-spoken caveman
A vampire who wants to be a lifeguard (Sorry again, already used that in NORTON THE VAMPIRE)
A mummy who flies

The final idea generator is Randomizing. This was shared with me by a couple of cartoonists who like to get together and use Pictionary cards to help them generate story ideas. That’s exactly what you do. You randomly draw three Pictionary cards and select three or four ideas and string them together to form a story. It’s a lot of fun and is actually another use for Pictionary at parties, especially among the younger set who really love this.

Here’s how it works:
I select scarecrow, race cars and trophy from the Pictionary cards in front of me. Inspiration strikes and I whip up the story of a scarecrow that races cars, but has a natural problem in that when the car goes too fast, he loses his straw due to the excessive winds. He has to win back a trophy to save his farm from going belly up. All the other farm animals don’t have faith in him, and he must dig deep to solve his dilemma.

You can see changing expectations and odd pairings at work in the summary of my word play novel written to inspire young writers, STOMPER REX.

WITH THE OPENING OF A HATCH that appears on his ceiling, a troubled mortal boy, Stomper, is enlisted to save the fractured land of Crawlspace and reunite the magic. Trouble comes from all directions once he sets foot in the magical world of the written word. If Stomper can master alliterations, homophones, rhymes, similes and idioms before they do him in, Crawlspace might just have a fighting chance.

STOMPER REX is a romp through a magical world of dangerous word play. In the vein of THE PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH, this whimsical fantasy is a tale with lethal homophones, alliteration gone acutely awry and a host of hideous puns let loose that will disgust and confound.

Brian Clopper is a 5th grade teacher who dreams of a day when he too can set foot on a magic ladder and ride his way into a world where when hens fly to turn back time, skewer cougars hunt for unsuspecting children to shish kabob and boxing slugs engage in the rowdy gentleman’s sport of slimy fisticuffs.

Skewer cougars and boxing slugs are odd pairings, while when hens are a changing expectation. Who would think that riding atop a flock of harmless-looking birds would allow you to travel back in time? It’s all part of the magic that makes the world of Crawlspace come alive.

Odd pairings, Changing Expectations and randomizing are excellent ways to fill up your idea journal with tons of story possibilities. So what are you waiting for, get off your tuckus and get creating. There’s a zebra plumber or an ornery unicorn waiting for you to bring them to life.

Just so you know, I loaded a new book, STOMPER REX, onto the Kindle and Nook. It’s a perfect book to engage young writers with how to improve their writing using a variety of narrative techniques. Piers Anthony sung its praises, as he has all five books I’ve sent him over the years, in his most recent newsletter. I’m so proud of what he said, I just feel compelled to share it with you.

“I read Stomper Rex, by Brian Clopper. Bradford, nicknamed Stomper, is a fifth grader who has issues at school. He lives with his mother, his father having walked out. His mother is understanding but firm about his need to shape up. She gets him a tutor, Wanda, a teen girl he has a crush on, so he does pay attention as she reviews the material. This setting is competent, as the author is a fifth grade teacher; the secondary characters are well rounded. Then two odd men descend from his bedroom ceiling to take him to a fantasy land where he is needed. They are Ruffloon and Strivelwunk, who put him on a ladder which then flies into the land of Crawlspace, where there are many monsters, and much of the magic is made by figures of speech. Yes, the very thing he is having trouble with in school. I suspect this novel was a female dog to write, because coming up with relevant figures of speech when you need them can be a challenge, as I have found in my own writing. For example, when he is threatened by multiple snakes, he says “Fake snake!” and they merge into one pretend snake. That’s pretty simple, but others aren’t, such as “Try knocking loose those lox.” That’s homophone magic to make locks give way. It seems he has been summoned to defeat the cruel mistress of this realm, Stigma, a girl who visited but then decided to stay and rule, and they need to be rid of her. They have many adventures, requiring different figures of speech. Naturally there’s a climactic showdown, and strange things happen as they fight with whatever figures of speech they can think of under pressure. This novel represents a kind of course in figures of speech, and fifth graders who read it will surely develop a better understanding and possibly become better students. That may be the hidden agenda. This author continues to be a writer who deserves better attention in the literary world; this novel is anything but mindless.”

 

Free book giveaway, Friday, Indie Authors, inspiration, new authors, S.M. Boyce, writing advice

Free Book Friday with S.M. Boyce

>   ***We are sharing this post again for the first time since so many of our friends couldn’t comment on it over on the Blogger site.  If you want to win a free ebook copy of The Grimoire: Lichgates, then leave a comment.  Help us test our new site’s comment abilities and you may win this awesome debut novel!***

S. M. Boyce is sarcastic, gooey, and laughs too much, but her friends seem to hang out with her anyway. She’s also a fantasy author and novel editor who recently published her debut novel, The Grimoire: Lichgates. It’s the first in a young adult fantasy adventure series called The Grimoire Trilogy.
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Hey gang! Thanks for having me today. I wanted to talk about two important factors in any writer’s life: writer’s block and story ideas.
I’ve hit road blocks plenty of times while writing. Over the years, I tried writing through writer’s block, writing stream-of-consciousness journals to get the gunk out, and watching TV instead of writing anything at all. None of these techniques really worked—for me.
The thing with writer’s block is that it’s different for each person. How you overcome it is all going to depend on your creative style. That’s exactly what you wanted to hear, right? Haha. Well, the good news is that I have some ideas for helping you figure out how to overcome writer’s block.
All you have to do to get some ideas of your own is to Google “overcome writer’s block.” Every writer I’ve ever met has encountered it at some point, and it’s a popular subject. The downside is that sorting through the endless pages can actually add stress, instead of easing your worry.
So let me tell you what works for me.
Before I even write a chapter, I plot it out. Sometimes, I go so far as to add dialogue, which gives me an idea of the characters and how they will interact in this particular chapter. That way, even if I don’t feel like writing or don’t know what to write, I at least have a place to start. Often, the inspiration comes back to me if I re-read the plot outline I made.
Other times, I have to get out of the house. I spend a lot of time in my office, and spending too much time in your creative place can actually stifle creativity. So I’ll walk the dog in the nearby woods, or go for a short drive. Getting some fresh air can get those creative juices flowing again.
A very popular method of getting over writer’s block is actually to start a writing journal. There are two kinds I’ve heard of.
The first writing journal is a daily journal. Every morning, as soon as you wake up, you write non-stop for ten minutes. Just go. Whatever you want. You can even write “um, um” until you come up with something. The point is that you’re writing and “cleaning out the cobwebs” so to speak. This one doesn’t work for me, but it has helped many writers I know.
The second writing journal is the one I keep. It’s a whenever-journal, one I keep close for when I get spurts of inspiration. Sometimes I just write a character sketch, or a line of dialogue. Other times, it’s an entire story idea. That’s how the Grimoire Trilogy came to be.
Whatever you do, keep a pen and paper with you at all times. You never know when inspiration is going to strike.
I heard once that you become a master at something after practicing the art for 3 hours over ten years. So never stop writing! It just takes time, practice, and a bit of patience.
What’s your favorite way of overcoming writer’s block? Share in the comments!  One lucky reader will win a FREE ebook copy of The Gimoire: Lichgates.  Don’t forget to share this link with your literate friends.  Just click one of the buttons below the post.

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Free book giveaway, Friday, Indie Authors, inspiration, Joshua Unruh, TEEN Agents

>Friendly Free Book Friday

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****Comment below to win a copy of TEEN Agents in the Plundered Parent Protocol.****
This week we are excited to introduce you to Joshua Unruh, author of the fabulously fun TEEN Agents series.  Today he shares with us how his childhood interests influenced the writing of The Plundered Parent Protocol.  (This is my daughter’s new favorite book!  And she is “totally a huge fan of Mr. Unruh.  He’s so cool!”  Well, there you go.  I can’t top that as an introduction.  Here’s Mr. Totally Cool himself, Joshua Unruh.

Sausage Innards
Heather asked me to talk a little bit about how the things I liked when I was a pre-teen and teenager (I’m old enough that there wasn’t a questionable label like tween when it would have fit me) fed into my fevered brain and came out as TEEN Agents in the Plundered Parent Protocol.
Well, this ought to be easy. A lot of the stuff I liked then is stuff I still like now!
I like it in a different, more grown-up way (or so I’ve convinced myself). But it’s still a lot of the same stuff from back in the day. That age is when I started to discover things other than superheroes that were going to gnaw into my brain like a worm and stay there forever. The second most important of those discoveries was espionage fiction. More specifically, it was Spy-fi.
For ease, I’m going to use the Wikipedia entry’s definition of Spy-Fi:
It often uses a secret agent (solo or in a team) or superspy whose mission is a showcase of science fiction elements such as technology and ideas used for extortion, plots for world domination or world destruction, futuristic weapons, gadgets and fast vehicles that can travel on land, fly, or sail on or under the sea.
My dad was a HUGE Man from U.N.C.L.E. fan when he was a kid. He got me watching it and, for some reason I still can’t understand, whatever channel ran it had Avengers afterward. No, not the superheroes with Iron Man and Captain America. Rather, a British male and female duo calmly and coolly handling all of Britain’s weird scientists and would-be worldbeaters. The godawful movie Wild Wild West, a Western Spy-fi, also came out around this time and, thank goodness, my dad was there for me on that one too. He let me know the seed was a television show that was not godawful.
Spy-fi felt to me like spies, which I loved, married with superheroes, which I loved EVEN MORE. The final nail in the coffin was discovering Nick Fury: Agent of SHIELD. This was superspies set in a comic book universe with existing superheroes and supervillains. Peanut butter meet chocolate.
My favorite Young Adult literature will always be superheroes. But when I decided to have female protagonists, I had to deal with the fact that the ladies don’t really dig on superheroes. But heroines have always had a strong place in Spy-fi. Emma Peel was at least as popular as John Steed. Contessa was a supporting character for Nick Fury, but she still managed to get a lot of solo stories. There was even a Girl from U.N.C.L.E. spin-off that I liked as much as the Man.
In the modern era, you have Bond girl Wai Linn (Michelle Yeoh) showing up the titular character. You’ve got Sydney Bristow (Jennifer Garner) leading an everything-and-the-kitchen-sink Spy-fi show called Alias for five seasons. There was a La Femme Nikita remake starring Maggie Q. Batwoman is the best Bat-Family book on the shelves. ABC Family, of all places, gave us Natalie Morales in The Middle Man, which feels like TEEN Agents after it graduated from college.
Clearly if I wanted to write a book with female protagonists that would appeal to young ladies as well as 12-year-old-me, it had to be a Spy-fi book. And that’s a biggest part of how TEEN Agents was born.
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